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20120926
20121004
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Sep 29, 2012 11:30am PDT
advance women and women making advancements in college education, in even doctors biology, chemistry, education. you're still seeing this bias in the sciences. are we ever going to overcome it? >> interestingly enough it turns out at yale, they have some of the higher numbers for women in the stem program. 39-46% of their women or of their students in that program are female and i think last year they had around 40 something percent graduation rate where the national average is 38%. what bothers or concerns me with this is some of this is still unfortunately, biased and prejudices. both from men and women. and that's really human nature and how do we get beyond that? because i think part of it, you see with the study that some women graded men higher and that's because they thought the guy was really more qualified or are you afraid you might lose your position? on the other side of that coin is where men, the bias is that do you want to keep an old boy's network or open up for women? so the other thing that i think we are working on but need to work hard ser to encourage our young w
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 6:00pm PDT
different view. i think we've got to invest in education and training. i think it's important for us to develop new source of energy here in america. that we change our tax code to make sure that we're helping small business and companies that where investing here in the united states. that we take some of the money we're saving as we weend down two wars to rebuild america. and that we reduce our deficit in a balanced way that allows us to make these critical investments. now, it ultimately going to be up to the voters, to you, which path we should take. are we going to double down on the top-down economic policies that helped to get us into this mess, or do we embrace a new economic patriotism that says america does best when the middle class does best, and i'm looking forward to having that debate. >> lehrer: governor romney, two minutes. >> thank you, jim. it's an honor to be here with you, and i appreciate the chance to be with the president. i'm pleased to be at the university of denver, appreciate their welcome, and also the presidential commission on these debates. and congrat
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 9:00pm PDT
education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legistors get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "ecial interestdo and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 10:00pm PDT
woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for pulic broadctin and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. welcome back. >> nice to be
PBS
Sep 25, 2012 10:00pm PDT
turned to education policy at a forum sponsored by nbc news. >> we have proven that sending a lot of money to failed schools to pay the same teachers to do the same things will not make any difference. the real key is leadership in drawing the best and brightest to the profession, giving them the right incentives, promoting the very best, helping our students have discipline in the classroom, insisting on the participation of parents. >> reporter: the candidate new york city stop came as another poll. this one from the "washington post" found ohio swinging toward the obama column. no republican has won the white house without ohio. with that in mind, romney and running mate paul ryan began a bus tour through ohio this afternoon. >> sreenivasan: the u.s. supreme court upheld west virginia's congressional redistricting plan today. critics of the redistricting had argued that the populations within newly drawn districts were too far out of balance, but the supreme court reversed a lower court ruling and said the state legislatures was correct in trying to keep counties intact, keep incu
PBS
Sep 28, 2012 4:30pm PDT
necessary to make any data meaningful. lou's been thinking about telling stories. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> i now get paid for what i used to get punished for-- telling stories! in my more than 30 years as a professional speaker and educator, i can say without fear that much of what we learn we learn through stories. the best bosses i have worked for, the best bosses i have interviewed over the years all tell stories. balancing hard, cold facts with stories satisfies both sides of our brains. the left side-- our judge and jury and number cruncher. and our right side-- our poet and comedian andrtist. a good story does three things: it helps us recall the past, it helps us understand the present, and if it teaches a lesson, as most good stories do, it allows us to have some idea of what the future may hold. even a story you have heard or read before may have a new meaning for you today. it's why we go back to texts, religious and otherwise, that have meaning for us. if you manage others, i hope you use stories to inspire, to set limits, maybe just to put a light touch on thing
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 5:30pm PDT
. and among youth, a large number of spanish youth will be in school, in education and therefore are not looking for work. so maybe it will be 50% of the 30% of the youth that is actually looking for work. so i'm not trying to minimize the problem, there is a significant risk of actually having a lost generation in europe, but the real number of spanish youth unemployment is not 50% of all spanish youth, for instance. it is considerably lower. but still a tremendous problem. >> ifill: and how many of those who are notooking are scouraged workers? we've had that conversation here in this country. >> absolutely. i mean, there's no doubt people suffer from a lot of the same problems that we have here in the united states. >> ifill: is there also a problem with coming to some sort of resolution as far as germany and other bank-- money-- money givers go? that somebody else is going to get in line. that if you give greece money, spain is going to be standing there. if you give spain money portugal could be standing there. >> there is this problem of political moral hazard going on which is
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 11:00pm PDT
together, civil society, i.e., ngos, ie, education, et cetera, bring them together with business, bring them together with government, both at the national or and at the sub national level and really collaborate intensely to come to a solution. >> rose: we continue this evening with matt damon and gary white, theyre cofounders of water.org. >> and i heard these statistics that were jaw dropping about a child dying every 20 seconds because of lack of access to clean water and sanitation, that is, that to me is just staggering, because -- because to relate to that as an american, i mean, we don't know people who are thirsty, it just doesn't happen, right? you know, with away don't know kid who die from diarrhea. >> rose: water is ubiquitous. >> yes, of course, or cholera for that matter, just clean water. so, you know, so that was one side of it, just the mindless death and bono talks about stupid death, you know, because it is preventable. >> we have known how to make water safe for more than 100 years, right? imagine we discovered the cure for aids today, and 100 years from now 3
PBS
Sep 28, 2012 10:00pm PDT
infrastructure that is really going to help us grow. i would like to see improvements in education. policy has been stalled for an extended period and a changing world. and we need to catch up. we have to prepare not just for having next year be good but the next ten years, the next 20 years. >> muhamed el-erian, y spokebout the monies tha's sitting on the sidelines and i hear ken rogoff referring to that too. with is it going to take that shake that loose to make business owners feel that it's a good thing to invest. >> it's going to take what ken said and critically, it's about a number of items that have to be addressed simultaneously. you know we like this notion. maybe there's a shortcut, maybe there is a killer app, maybe there is this one thing. well, there isn't. it's taken us years to get in this mess. it's going ttake us years to get out. and we only get out through simultaneous progress on a number of areas. so ken spoke to fiscal reform. he spoke to infrastructure. he spoke to education. i would add labor retraining and retooling. and i would also add fixing the credit pipes of
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 10:00pm PDT
rural district 8 that for decades used one-room schoolhouses to educate its kids. guglich says those days are long gone. >> within the last ten years, we had to start servicing not only the farming community but now the oil community. >> reporter: guglich expects his student body to double in size in the coming years as oil workers bring their families to williston and more affordable housing becomes available. today real estate prices here are on par with places like new york city and san francisco. new residents are routinely paying more than $2,000 a month in rent. those prices were a problem for guglich, who needed to increase his staff dramatically this year in a state that ranks next to last in the country in teacher pay. >> we hired 14 new teachers and we were able to find housing for most of them, but we still have five teachers who don't have permanent housing. some are staying on couches, some are staying in homes that are in the process of being sold, so they are sleeping on air mattresses, kind like squatting. >> reporter: one of those squatting teachers is melanie burrou
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 5:30pm PDT
education piece that will continue to be rolled out. you know, and the fact that poll workers can actually still ask people for i.d.s although they don't have to produce it in order to get a regular ballot. we think at the end of the day that the pennsylvania state nstitutioneallyoes prevent this kind of law from going forward because as the supreme court said it really wantedded to see, you know, make sure that there's no disenfranchisement. we think that there was 760,000 people that the state estimated were going to be impacted by this law. in fact, they have won because they will have access to the ballot in november. >> suarez: representative metcalfe, when is the next biggie leches in pennsylvania after november 6? and will you have time to answer some of ms. browne dianis' complaints? >> we don't need to answer her complaints. the constituion is very clear. this is the responsibility of the legislature. it stands within our area of responsibility to set this process up for the election and ultimately the way the courts have written these decisions, written these opinions it
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 4:30pm PDT
adjusted, or we don't create an educational system that really signals to students and provides them incentives and information that this is where the jobs are. >> reporter: but thrillist and zocdoc aren't giving up, doing all they can to attract workers and make them feel at home. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we'll continue our job retraining coverage with a look at gowill industries. it's the nation's largest non- profit dedicated to training workers and finding them jobs. and speaking of jobs, tomorrow, the government's monthly jobs report is out-- what it could mean for investors and the presidential election. >> susie: healthy food may soon be coming to a corner near you. two former mcdonald's executives launched lyfe kitchen last year in palo alto, california. now, they plan to take the restaurant and "it's good for you" menu nationwide. diane eastabrook has more. >> reporter: lyfe kitchen opened in the heart of silicon valley a year ago. lyfe, an acronym for "love your food everyday," serves up burgers, fish tacos, breakfast sandwiches, salads, even or
PBS
Sep 25, 2012 11:00pm PDT
one thing very clear. we were not wedded to mr. qaddafi or to mr. -- he was not educated in the russian federation, he was educate in europe. his friends were in western europe, not in russia. and when people say that you are protecting president assad, this is absolute ignorance of the real situation. >> rose: i believe you're protecting him, and why am i ignorant if -- >> wait charley, tell me in what way i was protecting him. >> rose: in several ways. most people believe that if they did not have russian support and iranian support, he would not last very long. both in terms of arms and in the iranian case, some suggest more than that. without iranian support and russian support, most people believe that president assad would be out of syria in a shorter time than otherwise he might last. >> that's the power of the media. the media covering the hearing crises, in most creases, and politicians by the way when they address the public through the media, thinking, i believe, not only about the fure of syria but also the domestic political positioning, they speak in very straightf
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 5:00pm PDT
couple said the vows. he's a groom to be. he'll marry his japanese girlfriend next year. he was educated mainly in britain. now he works in tokyo at his mother's korean restaurant. he taught himself japanese and is fluent. marrying a nonkorean seemed natural. >> translator: as a korean citizen living and working in japan who chose to marry a japanese woman, i feel the way the dispute is handled on tv is exaggerated. >> reporter: more than 40,000 korean japanese couples get married every year, but people didn't welcome the unions as much years ago as they do now. he's a third generation korean living in japan. the japanese colonized from the early 1900s until the end of world war ii. that bitter history kept people apart. he decided to feature the wedding ceremony to show how things have changed. >>ranslator: the old generation used to strongly oppose japanese and koreans getting married. that is not the case anymore for the younger generation. >> reporter: he's long hoped the bond between japanese and koreans become stronger. he supports the cross culture marriages. on the day of the wed
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 11:00pm PDT
educated women voters. those issues didn't come up in this debate, he didn't solve any problems with those people. you think about just in terms of the battle ground states, there's going to be a tightening, we're seeing a tightening already. but the obama people, we have a swing state possible this morning from nbc and "wall street journal" president obama ahead by 8 points in ohio. it remains the case tomorrow as it was earlier today that president obama, i don't see how, maybe that poll tightens a little bit but that's still a massive problem for mitt romney. how you win the presidency as a republican without ohio which has never happened in the history of the republic. this was an important debate and mitt romney did himself a lot of good but the one thing the obama taking comfort in they are still looking at those problems he has with specific voter groups that give president obama an advantage in the battle ground states and will continue to give him an advantage in terms of how to get to 270 which is ultimately what this is about. >> if you look athe eight to tenbatt ground st
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 4:30pm PDT
higher education front about the need to provide useful and adequate information to students. >> reporter: the idea is to help students ballpark their expected college cost, and the amount of debt they could take on to earn a degree. but the information isn't always complete, and could add more confusion to a process that's already too complicated. >> students and parents probably have too much information. there's so much formation out there it's hard for them to focus on what's really important in helping them make the right decisions. so a lot of the conversation is about new disclosures, part of the conversation has to be about streamlining the current disclosures. >> reporter: draeger showed us this book of all the things colleges and universities have to disclose to potential students. while a lot of this information explains what college will cost. consultant mark schneider says that's only half of what families should know. >> the information about wages, which is for me is the ultimate validation of the value of the degree, which is the ultimate consumer information
PBS
Sep 30, 2012 10:00am PDT
development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized, individual and oup retirement products. that's why we're you're your retirement company. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernathy. good to have you with us. aas p as protests continued debates were front and center at the opening session of the united nations general assembly in new york. in a strong speech, president obama again condemned the video as an insult to muslims and all americans, but america rejects it. >> given the power and faith and passion that it can inflame, the strongest weapon is not repression, it's more speech. the voices of tolerance that rally against bigotry and lift up the values of uderstanding and mumpl respect. >> he called on world leaders to speak out forcefully against extremism. >> na brand of politics that pits east against west and south against north and muslims against christians and hindus and jews can't deliver on the promise of freedom. >> many arab and muslim leaders renewed their can calls for a u.n. resolution to banal defamation of religion. egypt's
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 11:00pm PDT
markets to make sure it doesn't crash, and it is about efficiency. >> and market education? >> it can be, look for example, in retrospect, it is obvious, the banks need a higher capital assets. >> right. >> that requires regulation. >> and higher capital requirements? >> ye they did. and the systemic risks were far too buying and you need to regulate properly to do that and in the uk we are trying to get a greater separation between the retail side of banking and the investment side of banking. so look, the lesson of 2008, market reform is essential, under regulated markets have a tendency to crash. but let's not think that somehow that means that an old-fashioned state is going to be the answer. i mean, let's give you an example which may be to american eyes is challenging. we have a national health service. >> right. which. >> had one for a while. >> >> tax funded, universal service for all britains use it. we know we need to reform that, we need to reform it so that we get much greater responsibility of citizens as well as clinicians because we know that in diabetes or asthma self man
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 11:00pm PDT
strategy to train and educate afghan security forces. there's no train-- attempt at strategy. >> rose: when the french going out? >> well, some of them have left already. some of the combat troops. but i have to add the french stay committed. they continue to contribute in different ways. among other things they contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan. >> rose: but combat soldiers will be leaving by the end of 2013? >> actually by the end of this year. so they are in the process now of withdrawing but they still contribute trainers to our training mission in afghanistan so they stay committed until the end of 2014. >> rose: it's a presence but not a combat presence then. >> the same goes for the coalition partners. we have different tasks within and some people contribute trainers, others contribute combat troops. >> rose: okay. at the beginning of 2014 how many nations will do you think will be contributing combat troops? >> we don't know yet because that will very much depend on the security situation on the ground. >> rose: so it may not leave before 201
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 11:00pm PDT
welcomed in that respect. >> rose: some people be you have been part of her education. >> um... plaimaybe the combination that s place in changes-- exchanges between a person who started physics,ike mrs. merkel d the modest economies may be productive. >> rose: one of the things you pointed out to me this summer which i particularly found fascinating, there's also culture here, the culture of individual nations. >> it's almost only culture. >> rose: meaning? >> meaning that-- i mean, culture is how people behave, what-- for example, anglo-saxons, the u.k., the u.s., tend to see a bigger role for economic activities in the sense of aggressive management of demand through budgetary aggressiveness, if needed monetary policy. not so the germans, the germans are more linked to the notion-- i sometimes say for gem ans it is-- they see growth as something flowing to the benefit of those who practice virtue. virtue for a household is to engage in a lot of savings, being moderate in consumption, for a government is not to run a deficit. for a country, virtue is to have your balance of payments, if
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)